Doing business in: the US
Produced in partnership with Jonathan Edgelow and Lydia Sadler of Vedder Price and Richard Thomas of ZSM Consultancy
Doing business in: the US

The following Commercial practice note Produced in partnership with Jonathan Edgelow and Lydia Sadler of Vedder Price and Richard Thomas of ZSM Consultancy provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Doing business in: the US
  • Introduction
  • The business environment
  • Forming a company
  • Financing a company
  • Opening a bank account
  • Utilising office space
  • Immigration controls
  • Key employment laws
  • Equal employment opportunity
  • More...

Updated in May 2015

Introduction

The business environment

Forming a company

Financing a company

Opening a bank account

Utilising office space

Immigration controls

Key employment laws

Contracting with third parties

Taxation overview

Regulatory compliance

Protecting key assets and employees

Useful links

Introduction

The US has one of the most competitive economies in the world. It is the largest national economy with an estimated GDP of over $US 17.4tn in 2014 and is a top-performer on the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business Index. There are a number of compelling reasons why international companies establish a presence in the US. The most significant factors are access to the strong US economy and advanced technology, political stability and a highly developed legal system with well-established judicial, regulatory and government authorities.

There are a variety of ways of structuring a business operation in the US. The aim of this guide is to highlight some of the key areas that a new business should consider before it begins to operate in the US. This guide should not be considered to be an all-inclusive guide and specific US legal advice should always be sought before setting up and running a business in the US.

The laws and regulations affecting the conduct of business in the US discussed below stem from two major sources: the federal government and State governments. Federal laws are derived from the US Constitution, which established the framework of the US government, and

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