Doing business in: Taiwan
Produced in partnership with Patrick Marros Chu of Lee and Li, Attorneys-at-Law and David Tien
Doing business in: Taiwan

The following Commercial practice note Produced in partnership with Patrick Marros Chu of Lee and Li, Attorneys-at-Law and David Tien provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Doing business in: Taiwan
  • Introduction
  • The business environment
  • Forming a company
  • Financing a company
  • Opening a branch office
  • Opening a bank account
  • Utilising office space
  • Immigration controls
  • Key employment laws
  • More...

Updated in August 2020

Introduction

The business environment

Forming a company

Financing a company

Opening a branch office

Opening a bank account

Utilising office space

Immigration controls

Key employment laws

Contracting with third parties

Taxation overview

Regulatory compliance

Protecting key assets and employees

Useful links

Introduction

Since the mid-twentieth century, Taiwan has been one of the 'Asian Tigers' maintaining a dynamic capitalist economy with a strong presence in international markets. According to the World Trade Statistical Review 2020, Taiwan is the 17th largest exporter and 17th largest importer in the world merchandise trade in 2019, and IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook 2020 ranked Taiwan as the 11th most competitive economy in the world. In addition, the government offers various attractive incentives to make Taiwan more business-friendly. With a stable political environment and domestic market, significant technical expertise in both hardware and software engineering, abundant high-quality human resources, well-established infrastructure, and favourable investment acts, Taiwan provides an attractive business climate.

Further, since it is located in the heart of the Asia Pacific region, Taiwan is a strategic platform connecting some of the major economies including the US, China, Japan, Korea and emerging markets such as the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC). In June 2010, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and Taiwan signed Economic Cooperation Framework Agreement (ECFA), which strengthens Taiwan's position as an attractive economic hub for international companies. Thus, Taiwan is ideal for manufacturing goods and providing services for both domestic and

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