Doing business in: South Africa
Produced in partnership with Graeme Palmer of Garlicke & Bousfield Incorporated
Doing business in: South Africa

The following Commercial practice note Produced in partnership with Graeme Palmer of Garlicke & Bousfield Incorporated provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Doing business in: South Africa
  • Introduction
  • The business environment
  • Forming a company
  • Financing a company
  • Opening a branch office
  • Opening a bank account
  • Utilising office space
  • Immigration controls
  • Key employment laws
  • More...

Updated in July 2020

Introduction

The business environment

Forming a company

Financing a company

Opening a branch office

Opening a bank account

Utilising office space

Immigration controls

Key employment laws

Contracting with third parties

Taxation overview

Regulatory compliance

Protection of personal information

Protecting key assets and employees

Useful links

Introduction

As one of the largest economies on the continent, South Africa is a suitable base for generating investment and trade with the rest of Africa, particularly in the sub-Saharan region. South Africa has a well-developed infrastructure and established trade links with the rest of Africa.

There are a variety of ways of structuring a business operation in South Africa. The aim of this guide is to highlight some of the key areas that a new business should consider before it begins to operate in South Africa. This guide should not be considered to be an all-inclusive guide and specific South African legal advice should always be sought before setting up and running a business in South Africa.

South Africa consists of three levels of government, namely: national, provincial and local government. The National Assembly is the supreme law-making body and the laws made by it are applicable throughout the country. There are nine provinces, each with its own legislature, premier and executive council. While there are areas of exclusive legislative competence for the National Assembly, the various provincial legislatures can develop their own laws and policies within the national framework to suit their

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