Doing business in: New Zealand
Produced in partnership with Rodney Craig of MinterEllisonRuddWatts with the assistance of Lauren Archer and Silvia Curin Brown
Doing business in: New Zealand

The following Commercial guidance note Produced in partnership with Rodney Craig of MinterEllisonRuddWatts with the assistance of Lauren Archer and Silvia Curin Brown provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Doing business in: New Zealand
  • Introduction
  • The business environment
  • Forming a company
  • Financial reporting
  • Financing a company
  • Opening a branch office
  • Opening a bank account
  • Utilising office space
  • Immigration controls
  • more

Updated in April 2019

Introduction

The business environment

Forming a company

Financing a company

Opening a branch office

Opening a bank account

Utilising office space

Immigration controls

Key employment laws

Contracting with third parties

Taxation overview

Regulatory compliance

Protecting key assets and employees

Useful links

Introduction

New Zealand is an open and competitive economy with a population of around 5 million. New Zealand has a range of strong manufacturing and service sectors, which complement a highly-efficient agricultural sector. The economy is strongly trade-oriented, with the agricultural, horticultural, forestry, mining, energy and fishing sectors playing an important role in the export sector and employment. Overall, the primary sector contributes over 70% of New Zealand’s merchandise exports. Foreign investment is generally welcomed and the government is supportive of business, economic development and employment growth.

The business environment

New Zealand is currently ranked by the World Bank as the best country in the world for ease of doing business and starting a business.

New Zealand has also been ranked as the second least corrupt country, behind Denmark, by Transparency International in its Corruption Perceptions Index 2018.

The strength and durability of New Zealand’s economy can largely be attributed to the following factors:

  1. a strong primary sector that is quick to respond to global opportunities

  2. a flexible economy, which has been able to respond to shifts in markets and manage significant economic shocks

  3. a generally sound and