Doing business in: Brazil
Produced in partnership with Ted Rhodes, Mario Sergio Braz and Carolina Uribe of CMS
Doing business in: Brazil

The following Commercial guidance note Produced in partnership with Ted Rhodes, Mario Sergio Braz and Carolina Uribe of CMS provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Doing business in: Brazil
  • Introduction
  • The business environment
  • Forming a company/setting-up a subsidiary
  • Appointing an agent or distributor
  • Setting-up a branch office
  • Other set-up options and considerations
  • Financing a company
  • Opening a bank account
  • Utilising office space
  • more

Updated in February 2019

Introduction

Brazil is the fifth largest country in the world by both geographical area (3,287,956 sq mi), and population of just over 209,000,000, and with its US$2.056tn economy, it is the ninth largest economy by nominal GDP. Brazil also enjoys relative political stability and has made solid progress in reducing poverty and controlling inflation. This, in turn, has resulted in growth in the middle class.

Additionally, Brazil has vast natural resources. It is a leading global exporter of many farm products and minerals and, with the discovery of the ‘Pre-Salt’ oil fields, has significant reserves of oil and gas.

The wealth of natural resources, combined with the size of the economy and increased spending power of its population, makes Brazil a very attractive market for both multinationals and smaller companies in a variety of industries. Despite this potential, however, it is only over the last 15 years or so that Brazil’s visibility has improved on the world stage, with more and more investors considering Brazil as an essential part of their overall investment strategy and a gateway to the wider region. The hosting of the FIFA Confederations Cup in 2013, the FIFA World Cup in 2014 and the 2016 Rio Olympic and Paralympic Games allowed Brazil to market itself to the world and attracted investment in certain