Discharging reserved matters conditions on outline planning permissions
Discharging reserved matters conditions on outline planning permissions

The following Planning guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Discharging reserved matters conditions on outline planning permissions
  • What are reserved matters?
  • Time limits for discharging conditions on outline permission
  • Form of reserved matters application
  • Successive applications for reserved matters approval
  • Imposing conditions on a grant of approval of reserved matters
  • Nature of the development must not be altered
  • What can LPAs take into account at reserved matters stage?
  • Environmental impact assessment
  • Register
  • more

What are reserved matters?

An outline planning permission provides a decision on the general principles of how a site can be developed. Outline planning permission is granted with the reservation of certain matters for subsequent approval by the local planning authority (LPA) or the Secretary of State (known as ‘reserved matters’). These are defined in article 2 of the Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015 (the 2015 DMPO) in England and the Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (Wales) Order 2012 (the 2012 DMPO) in Wales as any of access, appearance, landscaping, layout and scale, in respect of which details have not been given in the application for outline planning permission. The 2015 DMPO and the 2012 DMPO define the reserved matters as follows :

  1. ‘access’—the accessibility to and within the site, for vehicles, cycles and pedestrians in terms of the positioning and treatment of access and circulation routes and how these fit into the surrounding access network

  2. ‘appearance’—the aspects of a building or place within the development which determine the visual impression the building or place makes, including the external built form of the development, its architecture, materials, decoration, lighting, colour and texture

  3. ‘landscaping’—the treatment of land (other than buildings) for the purpose of enhancing or protecting the amenities of the site and