Developing an advocacy practice
Produced in partnership with Ursula Rice of Family First Solicitors Ltd

The following Family practice note produced in partnership with Ursula Rice of Family First Solicitors Ltd provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Developing an advocacy practice
  • Why should a practice develop advocacy as a service?
  • Pitfalls
  • Combining with unbundled services
  • Suggestions for improving advocacy skill
  • Charges
  • Practical thoughts on advocacy

Developing an advocacy practice

Learning the art of advocacy is part of the training for solicitors, but many do not put it in to practice. Formal courses are delivered during the Legal Practice Course, and the Professional Skills Course goes on to enhance the level of skill during the training contract, but compared to the Bar the training is minimal. Prior to April 2013, legal aid family work produced enough advocacy opportunities for junior lawyers in particular to gain in confidence that they could bring it to their practice when they reached more senior levels, if they desired. The removal of so much work from the scope of legal aid means opportunities to practice advocacy are dwindling in the field.

This Practice Note looks at advocacy in the context of training and business development rather than the specific practical skills.

Why should a practice develop advocacy as a service?

The increase in the offering available to clients is likely to be appreciated and from the client's perspective there are a number of advantages. The most obvious one is the continuity of advisor. A client may feel less worried about involving separate professionals over such a personal matter, and that the person with the best knowledge of their situation is going to present it their case.

Key advantages to the firm include:

  1. advocacy services may be called upon at short

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