Designation of sanctions targets under the UN sanctions, EU sanctions and UK terrorist asset-freezing regimes
Produced in partnership with Roger Matthews of Dentons
Designation of sanctions targets under the UN sanctions, EU sanctions and UK terrorist asset-freezing regimes

The following Corporate Crime practice note Produced in partnership with Roger Matthews of Dentons provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Designation of sanctions targets under the UN sanctions, EU sanctions and UK terrorist asset-freezing regimes
  • The impact of Brexit on sanctions designations
  • What are designations?
  • What is the impact of sanctions designations?
  • UN sanctions designations and listing and de-listing
  • EU-level sanctions designations
  • Designations under the domestic UK sanctions regime
  • UK Designations under terrorist asset-freezing regimes
  • Power to designate under TAFA 2010
  • Content of a TAFA 2010 designation
  • More...

BREXIT: This Practice Note includes information on the designations on sanctions in the UK under EU law and how it is impacted by the UK’s decision to leave the EU. For more information, see Practice Note: Brexit—introduction to the Withdrawal Agreement as well as Brexit Bulletin—key updates, research tips and resources.

This Practice Note explains the process of the designation of sanctions targets by the United Nations (UN), EU and in the UK under terrorist asset-freezing regime. It also introduces sanctions designations under the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018 (SAMLA 2018), primary legislation passed in preparation for the end of the implementation period, which creates a power for ministers to pass sanctions regulations and creates a mechanism for the designation of sanctions and to challenge designations. For further guidance, see Practice Notes: Development of sanctions regime in the UK post Brexit—timeline and The UK sanctions framework under SAMLA 2018.

The impact of Brexit on sanctions designations

During the implementation period, EU sanctions, in the form of EU Regulations that have direct effect in Member States, will continue to be covered by UK domestic regulations made under the European Communities Act 1972 (ECA 1972). Thereafter, they will be replaced by UK sanctions made under the SAMLA 2018, to the extent that the UK seeks to mirror and maintain the same sanctions regimes as its European

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