Designation of sanctions targets under the UN sanctions, UK sanctions and EU sanctions regimes
Produced in partnership with Roger Matthews of Dentons, John Binns and Umar Azmeh of BCL Solicitors LLP

The following Corporate Crime practice note produced in partnership with Roger Matthews of Dentons, John Binns and Umar Azmeh of BCL Solicitors LLP provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Designation of sanctions targets under the UN sanctions, UK sanctions and EU sanctions regimes
  • What are designations?
  • What is the impact of sanctions designations?
  • UN sanctions designations listing and de-listing
  • UK designations under SAMLA 2018
  • UK designations under terrorist asset-freezing regimes
  • EU sanctions designations

Designation of sanctions targets under the UN sanctions, UK sanctions and EU sanctions regimes

With the passing of the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018 (SAMLA 2018), the UK gave ministers the power to implement sanctions regimes to replace those it had previously followed in the EU and provided for in Terrorist Asset-Freezing etc Act 2010 (TAFA 2010). This includes the power to make sanctions regulations created in respect of serious corruption and gross violations of human rights (‘Magnitsky sanctions’) which go beyond the scope of regimes established by the EU.

The UK launched its Magnitsky sanctions regime on 6 July 2020, with the Global Human Rights Sanctions Regulations 2020, SI 2020/680. A regime to use sanctions to combat serious corruption was introduced on 26 April 2021, with the Global Anti-Corruption Sanctions Regulations 2021, SI 2021/488.

The TAFA 2010 regime was replaced, with effect from 11 pm on 31 December 2020, with the Counter-Terrorism Sanctions (EU Exit) Regulations, SI 2019/577.

For information about SAMLA 2018, see Practice Notes: International sanctions—an introduction, The UK sanctions framework under SAMLA 2018 and UK sanctions regimes currently in force.

What are designations?

When a person (an individual, other bodies with legal personality (such as companies), as well as organisations, associations or groups of persons) is the target of a sanctions regime (see Practice Note: International sanctions—an introduction—What are sanctions?), they become

Popular documents