Dealing with the immigration regulator
Produced in partnership with Natasha Chell of Laura Devine Solicitors
Dealing with the immigration regulator

The following Risk & Compliance guidance note Produced in partnership with Natasha Chell of Laura Devine Solicitors provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Dealing with the immigration regulator
  • The Home Office: the UK's immigration regulator
  • Home Office enforcement strategy
  • What employers should know: compliance checks and immigration controls
  • Events that can trigger compliance visits or immigration actions
  • Purpose of compliance visits
  • Home Office enforcement powers
  • When and how to self-report
  • Keeping up with UK immigration

This Practice Note covers the role, strategy and enforcement powers of the Home Office as the UK’s immigration regulator. It sets out the key points employers should know about compliance checks, immigration controls and self-reporting. It also covers the sorts of events that can trigger compliance visits or immigration actions.

The Home Office: the UK's immigration regulator

The Home Office is the lead ministerial department of the UK government serving as the UK’s immigration regulator. The Home Office is in charge of border security, immigration control, reviewing applications, and issuing passports and visas.

The Home Office is supported in its immigration role by a number of agencies and public bodies, including:

  1. UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI)—runs the UK’s visa and asylum services, considers applications for British citizenship, decides sponsor licence applications, and manages appeals

  1. Border Force—secures the borders through immigration and customs checks, patrols the coast, and notifies authorities of individuals of interest

  1. Immigration Enforcement—prevents abuse, tracks immigration offenders and increases compliance with immigration law, increases compliance of UK immigration Rules and laws, and tracks offenders

  1. HM Passport Office—provides passport services to British nationals in the UK and abroad (in association with the Foreign & Commonwealth Office)

Corporate sponsorship

Employers must check employees' eligibility to work in the UK before they start work. Sponsoring migrants requires the employer to hold a sponsor