Criminal Procedure Rules (CrimPR)—update October 2018 [Archived]
Criminal Procedure Rules (CrimPR)—update October 2018 [Archived]

The following Corporate Crime practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Criminal Procedure Rules (CrimPR)—update October 2018 [Archived]
  • Appeal to the Crown Court
  • Appeal to the Crown Court—service of appeal and respondent’s notices
  • Appeal to the Crown Court—form of appeal notice and respondent’s notice
  • Appeal to the Crown Court—duties of the magistrates’ court
  • Appeal to the Crown Court—preparation for appeal hearings
  • Appeal to the Court of Appeal
  • Appeal to the Court of Appeal—changes to Part 39 appeal forms
  • Appeal to the Court of Appeal—service
  • Appeal to the Court of Appeal—change of grounds of appeal
  • More...

ARCHIVED: This archived Practice Note provides background information on the changes to criminal procedure which took effect on 2 April 2018. The Criminal Procedure Rules 2015, SI 2015/1490 have subsequently been amended. See Practice Note: The Criminal Procedure Rules.

This Practice Note states the law as at 2 October 2018 and is not maintained. It is for background information only.

The Criminal Procedure Rules 2015 (CrimPR), SI 2015/1490, have received their second update of 2018 by the Criminal Procedure (Amendment No 2) Rules 2018, SI 2018/847. These changes took effect on 1 October 2018.

This Practice Note highlights the key additions and amendments to the CrimPR of which corporate crime practitioners should be aware.

For information on the purpose and scope of the CrimPR generally, see Practice Note: The Criminal Procedure Rules.

For information on the implications of failing to adhere to the CrimPR, see Practice Note: Non-compliance with the Criminal Procedure Rules.

Appeal to the Crown Court

A number of significant changes are made to improve the procedure on appeal from the magistrates’ court to the Crown Court which aim make appeal hearings more effective. To achieve this, the Crown Court is to be provided with more information from the parties at the outset of the appeal and the court is given the ability to make necessary pre-appeal directions. Given that appeals to the Crown Court are by way of

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