Criminal Procedure Rules (CrimPR)—update April 2017 [Archived]
Criminal Procedure Rules (CrimPR)—update April 2017 [Archived]

The following Corporate Crime practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Criminal Procedure Rules (CrimPR)—update April 2017 [Archived]
  • New rules
  • Allowing sufficient time for consideration of the initial details of the prosecution case
  • Procedure for withholding information in applications for the retention or return of seized property
  • Police bail
  • Key amendments to existing rules
  • Consent orders in confiscation proceedings
  • Appeals to the Court of Appeal Criminal Division
  • Extradition proceedings
  • Other amendments to be aware of
  • More...

ARCHIVED: This archived Practice Note provides background information on the changes to criminal procedure which took effect on 3 April 2017. The Criminal Procedure Rules 2015, SI 2015/1490 have subsequently been amended on numerous occasions. See Practice Note: The Criminal Procedure Rules.

This Practice Note states the law as at 3 April 2017 and is not maintained. It is for background information only.

The Criminal Procedure Rules 2015 (CrimPR), SI 2015/1490, have been updated by amending statutory instruments, Criminal Procedure (Amendment ) Rules 2017, SI 2017/144 and the Criminal Procedure (Amendment No 2) Rules 2017, SI 2017/282. These changes took effect on 3 April 2017.

This Practice Note highlights the key additions and amendments to the CrimPR. For further information, see News Analysis: All change for the Criminal Procedure Rules?

New rules

Allowing sufficient time for consideration of the initial details of the prosecution case

Under CrimPR, Part 8, prosecutors at the first hearing must provide both the defence and the court with sufficient information to enable them to assess the prosecution case against the defendant and to enable them to decide how to proceed. This is known as initial disclosure. See Practice Note: Disclosure in the magistrates’ court and Disclosure time limits in criminal proceedings—checklist.

As many defence practitioners have experienced, in some cases this initial disclosure is often provided late or is insufficient, which in turn impacts the

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