Criminal Procedure Rules (CrimPR)—update April 2016 [Archived]
Criminal Procedure Rules (CrimPR)—update April 2016 [Archived]

The following Corporate Crime practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Criminal Procedure Rules (CrimPR)—update April 2016 [Archived]
  • What new rules have been created?
  • Starting proceedings in the Crown Court
  • Notice to introduce evidence of the defendant's own bad character
  • Identification of issues in the defense case
  • Crown Court assessment of costs
  • Procedure for additional types of search warrant, orders for the production of evidence and orders for the retention or return of seized property
  • What are the key changes to existing rules?
  • Time limits for taking the defendant's plea in the Crown Court
  • Reading aloud witness statements at trial in the Crown Court
  • More...

ARCHIVED: This archived Practice Note provides background information on the changes to criminal procedure which took effect on 4 April 2016. The Criminal Procedure Rules 2015, SI 2015/1490 have subsequently been amended on numerous occasions. See Practice Note: The Criminal Procedure Rules.

This Practice Note states the law as at 4 April 2016 and is not maintained. It is for background information only.

The Criminal Procedure Rules received their annual consolidation in the Criminal Procedure Rules 2015, SI 2015/1490 (CrimPR) and contain the rules and procedures relating to the conduct of criminal litigation in England and Wales. On 4 April 2016, the CrimPR will be updated to include a number of new rules and to amend certain existing rules in accordance with the Criminal Procedure (Amendment) Rules 2016, SI 2016/120. This Practice Note highlights the key additions and amendments to the CrimPR will take effect on 4 April 2016.

What new rules have been created?

Starting proceedings in the Crown Court

Usually, a defendant must be sent for trial in the Crown Court by a magistrates’ court. However, in certain circumstances, a defendant can be tried without first being sent by the magistrates. One such circumstance is under the Administration of Justice (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1933, s 2(2)(b) where a High Court judge may give a prosecutor permission to serve a draft indictment. This is usually used to

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