Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ad hoc Division
Produced in partnership with Daniel Meagher of Winston & Strawn
Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ad hoc Division

The following Arbitration practice note produced in partnership with Daniel Meagher of Winston & Strawn provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ad hoc Division
  • Purpose of the CAS ad hoc Division
  • Usage of the CAS ad hoc Rules
  • Jurisdiction
  • Basic principles—'fast, fair and free'
  • Seat and language
  • Lex arbitrii
  • Arbitrators
  • Rules of law applicable to the merits of the dispute
  • CAS ad hoc Division structure (arts 2–5)
  • More...

CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19): Many arbitral organisations have responded to the coronavirus pandemic with practical guidance and/or changes to their usual procedures and ways of working. For information on how this content and relevant arbitration proceedings may be impacted, see Practice Note: Arbitral organisations and coronavirus (COVID-19)—practical impact. For additional information, see: Coronavirus (COVID-19) and arbitration—overview.

Purpose of the CAS ad hoc Division

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) ad hoc Division was created for the arbitration of disputes that arise during major sporting events and must be finally settled within a 24-hour time limit. Those disputes are determined in accordance with the CAS Arbitration Rules applicable to the CAS ad hoc division for the Olympic Games (CAS ad hoc Rules).

Usage of the CAS ad hoc Rules

The CAS ad hoc Rules have been used for the following events:

  1. the Olympic Games, since 1996

  2. the Commonwealth Games, since 1998

  3. the UEFA European Championship, since 2000

  4. the FIFA World Cup, in 2006 and 2018

  5. the Asian Games, since 2014

The present CAS ad hoc Rules were established in 2003.

Jurisdiction

The purpose of the CAS ad hoc Rules is to provide, in the interests of the athletes and of sport for the resolution by arbitration of any disputes covered by Rule 61 of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Olympic Charter (Olympic Charter), insofar as they arise during the Olympic Games or during

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