Coronavirus (COVID-19)—key regulator and court guidance for corporate crime practitioners
Coronavirus (COVID-19)—key regulator and court guidance for corporate crime practitioners

The following Corporate Crime practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19)—key regulator and court guidance for corporate crime practitioners
  • Criminal courts in England and Wales
  • Scottish criminal court guidance
  • Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) guidance on custody time limits, interviews and decision to prosecute
  • Prisons
  • Inquests and fatal accident inquiries
  • Tribunals
  • Environmental regulators
  • Health and safety regulators
  • Serious Fraud Office
  • More...

Coronavirus (COVID-19)—key regulator and court guidance for corporate crime practitioners

As part of the response to the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the courts and various regulatory bodies have issued guidance to users and businesses explaining how daily court activity and the usual regulation of business activities have been adapted to account for the necessary restrictions implemented by the government to combat the impact of COVID-19.

This Practice Note highlights key guidance which will be of interest to lawyers advising on a range of corporate crime and regulatory issues during the pandemic and is intended to provide a convenient and accessible collection of guidance relevant to corporate crime practitioners.

Criminal courts in England and Wales

At the height of the pandemic, the work of the criminal courts was significantly disrupted and as lockdown restrictions ease HM Courts and Tribunal Service (HMCTS) is continually reviewing and prioritises the work being conducted in magistrates’ courts, Crown Courts, High Courts and the Court of Appeal, Criminal Division in order to ensure cases continue to be heard and that the backlog of criminal cases caused by the pandemic is addressed. The conduct of jury trials has been a particular area of focus as adaptations are made to ensure that criminal trials can take place while social distancing measures remain in force.

Practitioners will be interested in the following guidance issued by HMCTS and the Ministry of

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