Copyright in film and television—making a new film
Produced in partnership with Alexis Hawkes of BBC IP Legal
Copyright in film and television—making a new film

The following TMT practice note Produced in partnership with Alexis Hawkes of BBC IP Legal provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Copyright in film and television—making a new film
  • Underlying works—literary works
  • Scripts
  • Adaptations and derivative works
  • Translations
  • Other literary works
  • Letters
  • Biographies or accounts of factual events
  • Characters
  • Imaginary characters
  • More...

IP COMPLETION DAY: 11pm (GMT) on 31 December 2020 marks the end of the Brexit transition/implementation period entered into following the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. At this point in time (referred to in UK law as ‘IP completion day’), key transitional arrangements come to an end and significant changes begin to take effect across the UK’s legal regime. This document contains guidance on subjects impacted by these changes. Before continuing your research, see Practice Note: What does IP completion day mean for TMT?

When making a new film or television programme, a number of individual different copyright works will comprise the film depending on the type of production being made, eg a drama or a factual documentary. This Practice Note looks at some of the common underlying works incorporated into film and television productions. Some of these works will not automatically belong to the production company making the film so it is essential to take either an assignment or a licence of those works created as part of the production process which grants rights for the scope of exploitation intended. In the case of pre-existing works producers may wish to take a licence or rely on one of the exceptions to copyright in Chapter III of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (CDPA 1988), see the section: Permitted acts below.

Copyright is a territorial

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