Construction Law guide to Joint Contracts Tribunal contracts (2017) 28 1 Cons.Law 14 [Archived]
Construction Law guide to Joint Contracts Tribunal contracts (2017) 28 1 Cons.Law 14 [Archived]

The following Construction guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Construction Law guide to Joint Contracts Tribunal contracts (2017) 28 1 Cons.Law 14 [Archived]
  • Procurement
  • Design responsibility and insurance
  • Pricing and payment
  • Claims and extensions of time
  • Other common issues

ARCHIVED: This Practice Note has been archived and is not maintained.

This article appears as originally published in Construction Law on 1 February 2017 and is not maintained.

JCT contracts are organised according to procurement method, with different families of contract aligned to different procurement routes as Rachel Chaplin of DLA Piper explains.

Procurement

The JCT suite is the most comprehensive range of building contracts, designed to cover all types of contract from small domestic works through to major projects and with different allocations of design responsibility as between the employer and the contractor.

It is first and foremost a building contract, not an engineering contract, and should not be used for works which involve a large degree of engineering or process.

It is important to select a contract that not only reflects the value of the project but also the arrangements by which the project is to be designed and managed (the procurement).

Traditional procurement:

this contemplates that the design process will be undertaken separately from the construction; design will be undertaken by the employer's design team, thus remaining the responsibility of the employer, meaning he has more control over quality. If costs are to be controlled the design should be substantially complete before the works commence, as changes will normally incur additional expense. The Standard Building Contract (SBC) is an example