Consent orders and judgments
Consent orders and judgments

The following Dispute Resolution guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Consent orders and judgments
  • What are consent orders and judgments?
  • Consent orders and judgments without court approval
  • Consent orders and judgments needing court approval
  • How do I apply for the court's approval of a consent order?
  • Form of consent orders
  • The contractual interpretation of consent orders
  • What constitutes consent for the purposes of a consent order?
  • Consent orders when settling disputes
  • Consent order for discontinuance
  • more

This Practice Note gives guidance on what a consent order or a judgment is, when court approval is required to enter into a consent order, the form a consent order must take and when and how parties can vary or set aside a consent order. It also considers the court’s power to grant extensions of time for compliance with consent orders.

This Practice Note provides guidance on the interpretation and application of the relevant provisions of the CPR. Depending on the court in which your matter is proceeding, you may also need to be mindful of additional court specific provisions that may apply—see further main section: Court specific guidance below.

What are consent orders and judgments?

A consent order is a judgment or order made by the court but the terms have been agreed in advance by the parties. Depending on the scope of the consent order or judgment and whether any of the parties are a litigant in person, the court may enter and seal them. Otherwise court approval is required. For guidance, see: Consent orders and judgments without court approval and Consent orders and judgments needing court approval below.

Consent orders and judgments are used by parties to record:

  1. the terms of a compromise when a claim is settled, and

  2. the agreement of the parties in respect of certain interim