Conduct of the financial dispute resolution appointment
Conduct of the financial dispute resolution appointment

The following Family guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Conduct of the financial dispute resolution appointment
  • Advice prior to the FDR appointment
  • Conduct of the FDR

This Practice Note explains how a financial dispute resolution appointment (FDR) may be conducted, including the advice to be given to the client before the hearing, the role of the parties and the judge, the without prejudice nature of the FDR, proposals for settlement and what will happen if agreement is or is not reached. For practical guidance on preparation for the FDR appointment, including a checklist and best practice, see Practice Note: Preparation for the financial dispute resolution appointment. For practical guidance on private FDRs, see Practice Note: Private financial dispute resolution appointments and early neutral evaluation.

Additional considerations apply where the application is dealt with in the Financial Remedies Court, see Practice Note: The Financial Remedies Court — Best practice.

Advice prior to the FDR appointment

The client should be advised that the FDR appointment is not a court hearing in the conventional sense, but rather most of the day will be spent in a conference room or a public part of the court building engaged in negotiations. Both parties must personally attend the FDR appointment, unless the court directs otherwise.

It should also be emphasised to the client that the FDR can take a number of formats. On rare occasions there may even be no attendance before the district judge, whereas at other FDR hearings an hour or