Conditions of permission to enter or stay in the UK
Produced in partnership with Alex Piletska of Turpin Miller and Catherine Maclay of Self-employed locum
Conditions of permission to enter or stay in the UK

The following Immigration practice note produced in partnership with Alex Piletska of Turpin Miller and Catherine Maclay of Self-employed locum provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Conditions of permission to enter or stay in the UK
  • What are conditions of permission?
  • Conditions of permission and eligibility requirements under the Immigration Rules
  • Breach of conditions
  • The scope of conditions of permission
  • Work or occupation restrictions
  • No access to public funds
  • Police registration
  • Registration requirements
  • Exemption from registration
  • More...

Conditions of permission to enter or stay in the UK

People granted permission to enter or stay in the UK for a limited period frequently have conditions attached to their permission. These can include restrictions on work, occupation, study or claiming public funds, and a requirement to register with the police. For information on who requires permission to enter and stay, see the 'Who requires permission to travel to the UK?' topic in LexisNexis® Immigration.

This Practice Note explains the different types of conditions, when and how they can be attached to a person’s permission and the consequences of breach of conditions.

From 1 December 2020, the Statement of Changes in Immigration Rules HC 813 amended a number of provisions in the Immigration Rules to replace ‘leave to remain’ and ‘leave to enter’ with ‘permission to stay’ and ‘permission to enter’, respectively. This Practice Note will use the new terminology where relevant but note that these terms are interchangeable.

In broad terms, on 31 December 2020, European free movement law was revoked, and EEA and Swiss nationals, and their family members who are not eligible under the EU Settlement Scheme now require permission to enter and stay in the UK. Any permission granted after this date is subject to conditions as outlined in this Practice Note. For more information about these changes, see Practice Note: What does IP

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