Competition in onshore electricity transmission in Great Britain—Competitively Appointed Transmission Owners, the SPV model and the Competition Proxy model
Competition in onshore electricity transmission in Great Britain—Competitively Appointed Transmission Owners, the SPV model and the Competition Proxy model

The following Energy guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Competition in onshore electricity transmission in Great Britain—Competitively Appointed Transmission Owners, the SPV model and the Competition Proxy model
  • Quick links
  • Introduction
  • Chronological overview of the evolving position on implementing competition in transmission
  • The existing position
  • The CATO mechanism
  • The SPV model
  • The Competition Proxy model
  • The Hinkley-Seabank project
  • Known future transmission projects to which competition may apply

Quick links

If you are only interested in certain aspects of the evolving GB competition in transmission regime, you may find the following links to particular sections of this Practice Note useful:

  1. The existing position

  2. The CATO mechanism

  3. The SPV model

  4. The Competition Proxy model

  5. The Hinkley-Seabank project

Introduction

The Great Britain (GB) network of onshore electricity transmission lines have (since privatisation) been owned, maintained and improved by three licensed transmission system owners (TOs). These owners took the form of three privately-owned companies: National Grid Electricity Transmission plc (NGET), in respect of the transmission lines located in England and Wales, SP Transmission PLC (SPT) in respect of the transmission lines located in southern Scotland, and Scottish Hydro Electric Transmission plc (SHET) in respect of the transmission lines located in Northern Scotland/the Scottish islands.

The ‘system operator’ (SO) has a number of roles that apply across the onshore transmission networks owned by all three TOs. It is responsible for ‘balancing’ the end-to-end transmission system, ensuring (as near as possible, and in real time) that demand meets supply. It is also responsible for co-ordinating aspects of the physical development of the physical network, such that applications for connection to an onshore transmission system will always be made to the SO, regardless of which TO owns the physical network. This co-ordination

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