Combined Heat and Power Quality Assurance scheme (CHPQA)
Produced in partnership with Matthew Collinson
Combined Heat and Power Quality Assurance scheme (CHPQA)

The following Energy practice note Produced in partnership with Matthew Collinson provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Combined Heat and Power Quality Assurance scheme (CHPQA)
  • What is the Combined Heat and Power Quality Assurance scheme (CHPQA)?
  • What are the benefits of the CHPQA?
  • Where can I find the CHPQA?
  • What are the requirements of the CHPQA?

What is the Combined Heat and Power Quality Assurance scheme (CHPQA)?

The CHPQA is a scheme operated on behalf of the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) in consultation with the Scottish Executive, the Welsh Parliament, and the Northern Ireland Department of Enterprise, Trade and Investment.

The aim of the scheme is to assess, monitor and improve the quality of combined heat and power (CHP) in the UK. CHP is an important part of the UK’s low-carbon ambitions, as it uses the waste energy produced by electricity generation to provide heat directly to domestic and non-domestic properties (broadly, in the form of hot water and steam conveyed through a circuit of pipes; it is therefore a particularly efficient form of generation and is sometimes known as ‘co-generation’. For further information on CHP projects generally, see Practice Note: An introduction to Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Projects.

What are the benefits of the CHPQA?

Participation in the CHPQA is voluntary, but achieving CHPQA certification is often a legal precursor to eligibility for renewable incentives available for certain types of CHP generation under the Renewables Obligation (RO) and Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI), among others. BEIS states that this is to ensure that the fiscal benefits of these schemes are in line with the environmental performance of the CHP plant. This is an effective incentive, as access to subsidies

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