Clinical commissioning group governance in England
Produced in partnership with Addleshaw Goddard
Clinical commissioning group governance in England

The following Local Government guidance note Produced in partnership with Addleshaw Goddard provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Clinical commissioning group governance in England
  • What are Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs)?
  • Understanding the importance of good governance for CCGs
  • Principles of good governance
  • CCG constitution as a means of supporting good governance
  • Role of the CCG governing body in supporting good governance
  • Creating and maintaining an effective governing body
  • Recommended processes to achieve good governance
  • Actions to realise good governance
  • Duty to raise concerns about governance

What are Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs)?

Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) are National Health Service (NHS) organisations, comprising a consortia of General Practitioner (GP) practices, set up by the Health and Social Care Act 2012 (HSCA 2012) to organise the delivery of NHS services in England.

Born out of the reform initiated by HSCA 2012, CCGs became responsible for the provision of secondary medical services while Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) were abolished and significant amendments were made to the National Health Service Act 2006 (NHSA 2006). Responsible for approximately two-thirds of the total NHS England budget, CCGs commission decisions and develop the healthcare strategy for their local communities.

The core powers and duties of CCGs are set out in statute with the key legislative framework consisting of NHSA 2006, HSCA 2012 and the National Health Service (Clinical Commissioning Groups) Regulations 2012, SI 2012/1631.

Understanding the importance of good governance for CCGs

Good governance has been described as:

‘the ways in which organisations conduct themselves to ensure that they carry out their duties successfully and to the standards expected of them. It is concerned with accountability and responsibilities and describes how an organisation is directed and controlled.’

When considering good governance, one has to examine the conduct and decision-making processes of the organisation.

The Financial Reporting Council identifies the underlying principles of all good governance