Climate change adaptation in public procurement
Produced in partnership with CLT Envirolaw
Climate change adaptation in public procurement

The following Local Government guidance note Produced in partnership with CLT Envirolaw provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Climate change adaptation in public procurement
  • Brexit impact—public procurement
  • What is climate change adaptation?
  • Public procurement regulatory regime
  • Award criteria
  • Remedies
  • Climate change adaptation in public procurement

Brexit impact—public procurement

The UK public procurement regime derives from EU public procurement laws, and is therefore impacted by the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. For general updates on the process and preparations for Brexit, see Practice Note: Brexit timeline. For further reading on the impact of Brexit on public procurement, see Practice Note: Brexit—the implications for public procurement.

What is climate change adaptation?

Climate change adaptation refers to predicting any adverse effects of climate change and foreseeing ways to prevent or minimise the negative impact that can be caused, or by taking appropriate action where possible, or indeed benefitting from any advantages or opportunities which may present themselves.

It requires changing the way things are done to prepare for the potential effects of climate change. The UK Government published its Policy Paper entitled ‘2010 to 2015 government policy: climate change adaptation’ which sets out its approach to what government, businesses and society are doing to adapt better to the changing climate.

Public procurement regulatory regime

The principal aim of public procurement law is to regulate the entering into of contracts for the purchase of goods, works or services by public sector bodies. The law is driven from the European Union in order to facilitate the first timing of the internal market across member states.

The Public Contracts Regulations