Civil appeals—leapfrog appeals procedure
Civil appeals—leapfrog appeals procedure

The following Dispute Resolution practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Civil appeals—leapfrog appeals procedure
  • Coronavirus—implications for appeals
  • Leapfrog appeal
  • The authority to grant leapfrog appeals to the Court of Appeal
  • Leapfrog appeals to the Court of Appeal—procedure
  • Powers of the Court of Appeal on transfer of a leapfrog appeal
  • Authority for leapfrog appeals to the Supreme Court (UKSC)
  • Leapfrog appeals to the UKSC—Procedure

Coronavirus (COVID-19): The guidance detailing normal practice set out in this Practice Note may be affected by measures concerning process and procedure in the civil courts that have been introduced as a result of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The key implications for civil appeals are set out below. For general guidance on the implications of the pandemic for dispute resolution practitioners, see Practice Note: Coronavirus (COVID-19) implications for dispute resolution.

Coronavirus—implications for appeals

For guidance on the measures that have been introduced as a result of the coronavirus pandemic that are of relevance to those involved in appeals in the civil courts and which may impact the guidance concerning normal practice set out in this Practice Note, see: Starting an appeal—general provisions—Coronavirus—implications for appeals.

For specific guidance on the implications of the pandemic for appeals to the Supreme Court, see Practice Note: Coronavirus (COVID-19) implications for dispute resolution—Appeals to the UK Supreme Court duringcoronavirus.

Leapfrog appeal

A leapfrog appeal is an appeal that is heard by a higher appellate court than would usually do so. For appeals that would ordinarily take place in the County Court or High Court, the destination of a leapfrog appeal is the Court of Appeal. For appeals that would ordinarily be heard by the Court of Appeal, the destination of a leapfrog appeal is the Supreme Court (UKSC).

For further information, see Practice Notes: Starting

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