Children of a parent with limited leave as a partner: procedure
Produced in partnership with Jo Renshaw of Turpin & Miller LLP
Children of a parent with limited leave as a partner: procedure

The following Immigration guidance note Produced in partnership with Jo Renshaw of Turpin & Miller LLP provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Children of a parent with limited leave as a partner: procedure
  • GOV.UK information pages on applications in this category
  • Timing of applications
  • Application procedure for entry clearance
  • Application procedure for limited leave to remain
  • Switching
  • Duration and conditions of leave
  • Advice on grant of leave
  • Challenging refusals

This Practice Note outlines the procedural requirements for an application for entry clearance or leave to remain as the child of a parent applying for or already granted limited leave as a partner under Part 8 or Appendix FM.

See Practice Note: Children applying for indefinite leave under Part 8 and Appendix FM: procedure for information on the procedural requirements for children applying for indefinite leave to enter or remain under Part 8.

The procedural requirements for children applying for indefinite leave to remain under Appendix FM will be included in Lexis®PSL Immigration in due course.

GOV.UK information pages on applications in this category

The former UK Border Agency’s website was decommissioned in February 2014 and its contents either transferred to the GOV.UK website, or in some cases replaced with new content. Information for individuals applying in various immigration categories is now presented on the GOV.UK website in a very different style and format. The GOV.UK pages intend to provide a straightforward and short summary of the key facts that a would-be applicant needs to know about each category, eg as to eligibility requirements, procedure and current fees, and to provide links to relevant forms and guidance. They are specifically aimed towards applicants (who are not well-versed in the technicalities and terms of immigration law), rather than immigration advisers. However, in our