Challenges for in-house lawyers in the telecommunications industry
Challenges for in-house lawyers in the telecommunications industry

The following In-House Advisor guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Challenges for in-house lawyers in the telecommunications industry
  • What day-to-day practical problems are you currently experiencing in your industry? (eg as a result of a new piece of legislation, a recent case, a new regulator, a non-legal set of circumstances which is creating difficulties for the legal team)
  • How are you approaching dealing with these challenges and resolving these problems on a practical level?
  • Are there any organisations, committees, trade associations or working groups active in your industry that are invaluable in helping you navigate these obstacles?
  • How do you see these areas developing in the future? Do you have any predictions for future developments?

What day-to-day practical problems are you currently experiencing in your industry? (eg as a result of a new piece of legislation, a recent case, a new regulator, a non-legal set of circumstances which is creating difficulties for the legal team)

From a purely practical point of view the group is under continual pressure—like others in the industry—to deliver higher levels of service to customers year on year while remaining competitive financially. We have to continually review how we deliver our services in a cost effective way. The industry is heavily regulated and we have to contend with that. In the UK our regulator is Ofcom and we have to continue to comply with our undertakings to it which change from time to time.

The legal risks we face therefore continue to evolve and are different from those confronted in the past. For example, currently there are 109 countries with privacy and data protection laws in force and a further 22 countries have legislation pending.

The European Commission is now seeking to refresh the European privacy framework through means of the draft General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Under discussion for over three years, the GDPR proposes to make radical changes to the existing EU privacy framework. A final text is expected towards the end of 2015 with a two year transitional