Cayman Islands trusts—jurisdictional background and legal framework
Produced in partnership with Mourant Ozannes and Carey Olsen
Cayman Islands trusts—jurisdictional background and legal framework

The following Private Client practice note produced in partnership with Mourant Ozannes and Carey Olsen provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Cayman Islands trusts—jurisdictional background and legal framework
  • Government
  • Judicial system
  • Legal professionals
  • Financial services
  • Banks
  • Investments
  • Stock Exchange
  • Insurance
  • Trusts
  • More...

Cayman Islands trusts—jurisdictional background and legal framework

This Practice Note provides an introduction to the Cayman Islands in the context of offshore trusts.

For general information about the Cayman Islands, see Practice Note: Private Client jurisdictional guide—Cayman Islands.

Government

The Cayman Islands is an autonomous British Overseas Territory, run as a parliamentary democracy. The Cayman Islands has a Governor, appointed by the Government of the United Kingdom. The Cayman Islands has its own Constitution, the most recent coming into effect on 6 November 2009, by which a Bill of Rights was brought into effect as the ‘cornerstone of democracy’ in the Islands (see paragraph 1(1) of the Bill of Rights (Laws of the Cayman Islands)). The Constitution was amended in 2016 to, among other things, raise the retirement age of judges of the Grand Court and to remove the power of the Governor to exercise disciplinary control over the Chief Justice and the President of the Court of Appeal.

The Cayman Islands has its own parliament, the Legislative Assembly, consisting of eighteen elected members representing the Islands' six districts. The Legislative Assembly is presided over by the Speaker, while the Constitution provides for a Premier, Deputy Premier and Deputy Governor, all of whom sit in the Legislative Assembly. The Speaker, Premier and Deputy Premier are appointed from the elected members.

The Deputy Governor and Attorney General are non-voting ex-officio members

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