Q&As

Can vehicular (car or van) use be exercised over a public bridleway by the landowner and their visitors, contractors and other invitees or is use limited to only horses, carts, cyclists and pedestrians?

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Produced in partnership with Jo Hannah of Winckworth Sherwood
Published on LexisPSL on 19/08/2020

The following Planning Q&A produced in partnership with Jo Hannah of Winckworth Sherwood provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Can vehicular (car or van) use be exercised over a public bridleway by the landowner and their visitors, contractors and other invitees or is use limited to only horses, carts, cyclists and pedestrians?

Can vehicular (car or van) use be exercised over a public bridleway by the landowner and their visitors, contractors and other invitees or is use limited to only horses, carts, cyclists and pedestrians?

A bridleway is defined as:

‘A highway over which the public have the following, but no other rights, rights of way, that is to say, a right of way on foot and a right of way on horseback or leading a horse with or without a right to drive animals of any description along the highway.’

In addition, cyclists have the right to ride bicycles which are not mechanically propelled vehicles on bridleways but they are required to give way to pedestrians and persons on horseback.

Section 34(1) of the Road and Traffic Act 1988 (RTA 1988) provides that it a criminal offence to, without lawful authority, drive a mechanically propelled vehicle on any road being a footpath, bridleway or restricted by-way.

RTA 1988, s 34(2A), however, provides that it is not an offence for a person with an interest in

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