Q&As

Can a landlord exclude itself from relying upon one or more grounds for opposition contained in section 30(1) of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954 by covenanting in the lease not to terminate a lease on (for instance) redevelopment grounds?

read titleRead full title
Produced in partnership with Alexander Campbell of Field Court Chambers
Published on LexisPSL on 18/06/2020

The following Property Disputes Q&A produced in partnership with Alexander Campbell of Field Court Chambers provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Can a landlord exclude itself from relying upon one or more grounds for opposition contained in section 30(1) of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954 by covenanting in the lease not to terminate a lease on (for instance) redevelopment grounds?
  • Grounds of opposition to a new business tenancy

Can a landlord exclude itself from relying upon one or more grounds for opposition contained in section 30(1) of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954 by covenanting in the lease not to terminate a lease on (for instance) redevelopment grounds?

Grounds of opposition to a new business tenancy

Part II of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954 (LTA 1954) makes provision in relation to business tenancies.

LTA 1954, s 25 provides that a landlord of a business tenancy may only terminate the tenancy by giving notice to the tenant in the prescribed form.

LTA 1954, s 25 sets out various formal requirements with which such a notice must comply. One such requirement is set out in LTA 1954, s 25(7):

‘A notice under this section which states that the landlord is opposed to the grant of a new tenancy to the tenant shall not have effect unless it also specifies one or more of the grounds specified in section 30(1) of this Act as the ground or grounds for his opposition.’

LTA 1954, s 30 sets out various grounds

Related documents:

Popular documents