Calculating life expectancy—personal injury and clinical negligence claims
Calculating life expectancy—personal injury and clinical negligence claims

The following PI & Clinical Negligence practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Calculating life expectancy—personal injury and clinical negligence claims
  • Life expectancy statistics
  • Period Life Tables
  • Projected Life Tables
  • The Ogden Tables
  • Use of population projections
  • Factors specific to the claimant
  • Rebuttable presumption: claimant’s life expectancy is normal
  • Loss of earnings
  • Bespoke life expectancy evidence
  • More...

Life expectancy statistics

Tables providing life expectancy are prepared and released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). These tables are now referred to as Life Tables and are published once a year.

The figures contained in the tables are derived from population estimates and information on births and deaths over a three-year period. They set out the number of years that a person could, on average, expect to live from any age from 0 to 100. There are separate tables in respect of males and females. The tables of course do not and cannot provide more specific information about individuals or groups within the population. They merely provide an average over the population and do not exclude deaths with any particular cause. In fact the policy is to include all data and not to exclude any information such as multiple deaths resulting from one incident. Thus, they provide a very broad estimate of a particular claimant’s life expectancy. The statistics do not merely provide information on the number of years a person of a given age can be expected to live. They also provide the following:

mxis the central rate of mortality, defined as the average annual number of deaths at age x last birthday in the three-year period to which the Period Life Table relates divided by the

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