Q&As

As the Equality Act 2010 does not state who is liable for the costs of compliance, does this mean that the landlord will always be responsible for the costs of compliance in respect of premises let or to be let?

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Produced in partnership with Katherine Illsley of 4 King’s Bench Walk
Published on LexisPSL on 15/03/2017

The following Property Q&A produced in partnership with Katherine Illsley of 4 King’s Bench Walk provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • As the Equality Act 2010 does not state who is liable for the costs of compliance, does this mean that the landlord will always be responsible for the costs of compliance in respect of premises let or to be let?

If someone is disabled they may, in some circumstances, ask their landlord or the manager of their rental property to provide extra services or to make alterations to the home in order to mitigate a particular disadvantage arising from their disability. Only the landlord or manager of the property has a duty to make reasonable adjustments pursuant to the Equality Act 2010. This will include the owner of the property, a local authority and a housing association.

Reasonable adjustments are expected in two areas. Firstly, a landlord or manager must amend any policy or practice which disadvantages someone because of their disability. This could include altering a tenancy agreement, for example by allowing a guide dog when there is usually a clause prohibiting pets from being kept. Secondly, extra services or support may be necessary, such as providing the tenancy agreement in braille.

The landlord or manager is only obliged to make adjustments if they are reasona

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