Arbitration annual round-up—international arbitration—key seats: reviewing 2017 and previewing 2018 [Archived]
Arbitration annual round-up—international arbitration—key seats: reviewing 2017 and previewing 2018 [Archived]

The following Arbitration practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Arbitration annual round-up—international arbitration—key seats: reviewing 2017 and previewing 2018 [Archived]
  • Reviewing 2017
  • Arbitration in the Americas
  • What happened?
  • What are the key implications?
  • Want to know more?
  • What happened?
  • What are the key implications?
  • Want to know more?
  • What happened?
  • More...

ARCHIVED: This Practice Note has been archived and is not maintained.

This year’s annual roundup on international arbitration—key seats reviews some of the most significant developments of 2017 and previews what is on the horizon for 2018. This includes key cases and legislative developments from the USA, UAE, China, Singapore, Hong Kong, India and others. Also included are updates on LexisNexis®’s content, including news of exciting developments from the past year and what is coming up in the next 12 months.

Given the potential breadth of this review, we have limited our coverage to only a selection of the key developments.

Reviewing 2017

Arbitration in the Americas

What happened?

In the USA, Steve Finizio, partner at WilmerHale, comments, ‘it has been a quieter year with regard to international arbitration developments, and the US Supreme Court has not issued any decisions on arbitration-related issues that appear likely to be significant for international arbitration. There have been, however, several recent cases that reflect the fact that US courts continue to wrestle with the application of concepts such as sovereign immunity, forum non conveniens, personal jurisdiction and comity as they relate to the enforcement of arbitral awards, and, in particular, enforcement of awards against sovereigns. Lower courts in the US have taken different approaches on some of these issues. For example, some courts have held that the forum non conveniens doctrine does not apply

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