Appeals—Denmark—Q&A guide

The following Dispute Resolution practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Appeals—Denmark—Q&A guide
  • 1. Outline and explain the general structure of your country’s court system as it relates to the commercial appellate process.
  • 2. Are there appellate courts that hear only civil matters?
  • 3. Are appeals from administrative tribunals handled in the same way as appeals from trial courts?
  • 4. Is there a separate appellate bar or other requirement for attorneys to be admitted before appellate courts?
  • 5. If separate jurisdictions exist for particular territorial subdivisions or subject matters, explain their main differences as to commercial appeals.
  • 6. What are the deadlines for filing an appeal in a commercial matter?
  • 7. What are the key steps a litigant must take to commence an appeal?
  • 8. How is the documentation for appeals prepared?
  • 9. In commercial matters, may litigants appeal by right or is appellate review discretionary?
  • More...

Appeals—Denmark—Q&A guide

This Practice Note contains a jurisdiction-specific Q&A guide to appeals in Denmark published as part of the Lexology Getting the Deal Through series by Law Business Research (published: April 2021).

Authors: Lundgrens—Dan Terkildsen; Emil Hald Winstrøm

1. Outline and explain the general structure of your country’s court system as it relates to the commercial appellate process.

Denmark's court system is a national system consistent throughout the whole country, comprising:

  1. the Supreme Court;

  2. two high courts (the Eastern and Western High Court);

  3. the Maritime and Commercial Court;

  4. the Land Registration Court;

  5. 24 district courts; and

  6. the courts of the Faroe Islands and Greenland respectively (this article will not deal with the courts of the Faroe Islands and Greenland as they have autonomous court systems).

The administration of the court system is supervised by the Judicial Appointments Council and the Court Administration.

The legislation for appeal regulating Danish litigation is described in the Administration of Justice Act.

The courts are divided into a three-tier hierarchy. The lowest courts are the 24 district courts located throughout the regions of Denmark.

A trial will usually start in one of the 24 district courts. A trial can also start in the Maritime and Commercial Court or in either of the high courts. Generally, all cases can be tried in two instances, and in some cases, even three. A judgment rendered by a district court acting

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