Amendments to the Montreal Protocol 1987 (substances that deplete the ozone layer)—snapshot
Amendments to the Montreal Protocol 1987 (substances that deplete the ozone layer)—snapshot

The following Environment practice note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Amendments to the Montreal Protocol 1987 (substances that deplete the ozone layer)—snapshot
  • Article 5 countries
  • Summary of the current control measures
  • Decisions of the meeting of the parties
  • The Secretariat
  • Levels of consumption
  • Annexes
  • London Amendment to the Montreal Protocol 1990
  • Key provisions
  • Copenhagen Amendment 1992
  • More...

Brexit impact

As of exit day (31 January 2020) the UK is no longer an EU Member State. However, in accordance with the Withdrawal Agreement, the UK has entered an implementation period, during which it continues to be subject to EU law. This has an impact on this content.

For further guidance, see Practice Note: Brexit—impact on environmental law, and News Analysis: Brexit Bulletin—key updates, research tips and resources.

The Montreal Protocol is designed to reduce the production and consumption of ozone depleting substances in order to protect the ozone layer. The original protocol was agreed on 16 September 1987 and entered into force on 1 January 1989. See Practice Note: Montreal Protocol 1987 (substances that deplete the ozone layer)—snapshot.

There have been seven revisions to the Montreal Protocol, with four principal amendments:

  1. London Amendment 1990

  2. Copenhagen Amendment 1992

  3. Montreal Amendment 1997

  4. Beijing Amendment 1999

On 15 October 2016, the Kigali Amendment was agreed by 197 Parties to reduce hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) emissions by 2019. On 2 February 2017, the European Commission announced it has adopted a proposal for the EU to ratify the Kigali amendment. On 5 September 2017 the UK announced it has begun the process of ratification and on 14 November 2017 a further announcement was made that ratification was completed.

In developed countries, first reductions are due in 2019. Most developing countries will freeze the level of

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