Advising managers: delivering appraisal training
Advising managers: delivering appraisal training

The following Employment guidance note provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • Advising managers: delivering appraisal training
  • Why appraisal training is required
  • To whom appraisal training should be given
  • What appraisal training needs to cover
  • Delivering the training
  • When to conduct the training

An appraisal process can deliver significant improvements in morale, skills and staff retention, but to achieve these goals everyone involved needs to understand how to conduct effective appraisals and be aware of what appraisals can and can’t deliver.

Why appraisal training is required

Appraisals can cause a great deal of anxiety for many managers and employees.

Managers are typically concerned about:

  1. the time taken to complete them

  2. how to give feedback that is critical

  3. the feedback they may receive from their team and other colleagues

  4. adverse reactions from individual appraisees (tears, anger etc)

  5. completing the paperwork appropriately

Appraisees' main concerns are:

  1. fear of hearing where they are under-performing

  2. concerns about pay and reward (if appraisals are linked to financial incentives)

  3. cynicism about the effectiveness of appraisals

  4. not having the opportunity to put forward their version of events

  5. what to do if they feel they have received an unfair appraisal

Appraisal training is needed to address these concerns and respond to any other questions or worries those involved in the process may have.

To whom appraisal training should be given

If an employer is implementing a new appraisal process or making significant changes to an existing programme, ideally everyone involved in the process should attend training on it. Compulsory training programmes are rarely popular with those required to attend, but they are an