Q&As

A single sublessee of a block of eight flats claims a 90-year extension under the Leasehold Reform, Housing and Urban Development Act 1993. The lease is made by the freeholder as the competent landlord but there is an intermediate lease currently with about 60 years remaining. When that intermediate lease is automatically extended under the Act (and therefore has over 90 years remaining) is it correct to state that the intermediate lessor becomes the competent landlord for any future claim to an extension under the Act?

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Produced in partnership with Helen Galley of XXIV Old Buildings
Published on LexisPSL on 31/01/2018

The following Property Q&A produced in partnership with Helen Galley of XXIV Old Buildings provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • A single sublessee of a block of eight flats claims a 90-year extension under the Leasehold Reform, Housing and Urban Development Act 1993. The lease is made by the freeholder as the competent landlord but there is an intermediate lease currently with about 60 years remaining. When that intermediate lease is automatically extended under the Act (and therefore has over 90 years remaining) is it correct to state that the intermediate lessor becomes the competent landlord for any future claim to an extension under the Act?

A single sublessee of a block of eight flats claims a 90-year extension under the Leasehold Reform, Housing and Urban Development Act 1993. The lease is made by the freeholder as the competent landlord but there is an intermediate lease currently with about 60 years remaining. When that intermediate lease is automatically extended under the Act (and therefore has over 90 years remaining) is it correct to state that the intermediate lessor becomes the competent landlord for any future claim to an extension under the Act?

It is very common that there will be an intermediate landlord between the occupational long leasehold tenants of a block of flats and the freeholder. The length of the intermediate lease will be greater, but often not much greater, than the length of the term of the occupational long leases (flat leases) of the individual flats. The normal arrangement is that there is a freeholder, then a head tenant, often a management company, of the whole block and then individual flat leases. There may also be cases where the intermediate landlord holds a longer intermediate lease of an individual flat than the occupational tenant who owns the flat lease, but it will still be the occupational tenant of the flat lease has the right to a new lease so long as the occupational

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