Q&As

A lease plan for a residential long lease does not reflect the actual layout of the property, following works being carried out to the demise. Although the works were undertaken with the freeholder’s consent, no new plans were executed at the time. Where the freeholder refuses to execute a deed of variation to update the lease plan, can the leaseholder apply to the First-tier Tribunal to resolve the issue?

read titleRead full title
Produced in partnership with Chris Bryden of 4 King’s Bench Walk
Published on LexisPSL on 05/11/2019

The following Property Disputes Q&A Produced in partnership with Chris Bryden of 4 King’s Bench Walk provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • A lease plan for a residential long lease does not reflect the actual layout of the property, following works being carried out to the demise. Although the works were undertaken with the freeholder’s consent, no new plans were executed at the time. Where the freeholder refuses to execute a deed of variation to update the lease plan, can the leaseholder apply to the First-tier Tribunal to resolve the issue?

Where works have been carried out to a long residential lease so as to alter the layout of the property, for example due to an extension or a conversion, it will usually be advisable to vary the lease by way of a deed of variation so as to include a new plan. The reason for this is that if the leaseholder intends to sell their interest at a later date, difficulties may arise as the plan held by the Land Registry does not match the revised layout of the property. However, this is not a requirement and any such problems can usually be dealt with without difficulty by simply providing evidence of

Related documents:

Popular documents