Q&As

A client is selling a property and an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) has been provided to the buyer, however, the EPC will expire before the sale is completed. Does another EPC have to be obtained before the sale completes or is the existing EPC sufficient?

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Produced in partnership with Chris Bryden of 4 King’s Bench Walk
Published on LexisPSL on 16/03/2020

The following Property Q&A produced in partnership with Chris Bryden of 4 King’s Bench Walk provides comprehensive and up to date legal information covering:

  • A client is selling a property and an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) has been provided to the buyer, however, the EPC will expire before the sale is completed. Does another EPC have to be obtained before the sale completes or is the existing EPC sufficient?

An Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) is a requirement in respect of properties marketed for sale and/or letting and, from 1 April 2018, any property let on a new tenancy or a fixed term renewal (and, from 1 April 2020, all tenancies). An EPC lasts for ten years, after which it expires. The purpose of the requirement to supply an EPC is twofold—to promote energy efficiency on a macro level, and to enable prospective buyers and tenants to determine the affordability of heating and lighting bills.

EPCs are governed by the Energy Performance of Buildings (England and Wales) Regulations 2012, SI 2012/3118 as amended, made under the Energy Act 2011. Regulation 6 provides that where a building is to be sold or rented out, a valid EPC must be made available to any prospective buyer or tenant at the earliest opportunity and in any event no later than the provision of information or a viewing of the building. Regulati

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