Standing Orders

Standing Orders definition

/ˈstandɪŋ/ /ˈɔːdə/

What does Standing Orders mean?

The written rules formulated, agreed and codified by Parliament to regulate parliamentary business and proceedings. There are Standing Orders for both public and private business and they may cover, for example, how business is arranged and conducted, how time is to be allocated, and rules relating to the operation of parliamentary procedures and committees. 

Standing Orders explained

Standing Orders can be adopted, amended or repealed by a motion and decision of the relevant House. They are referred to as ‘standing’ orders as they do not lapse at the end of each session of Parliament. They continue to ‘stand’ in force from one session to the next. The UK’s central and devolved parliaments each have their own Standing Orders. Other public bodies, including local authorities, also adopt Standing Orders to regulate their operations and procedures in a similar way.

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