Moral Rights

Moral Rights definition

/ˈmɒr(ə)l//rʌɪts/

What does Moral Rights mean?

The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 confers a number of personal rights, known as moral rights, on authors that are additional to their economic rights. While copyright deals with economic interests, moral rights are about the reputation and integrity of the author that is publicly associated with the work.

Moral Rights explained

Moral rights are: the right to be identified as author of a work or director of a film (paternity); to object to derogatory treatment of a work or film (integrity); not to have a work or film falsely attributed to an author or director (false attribution) and to privacy of certain photographs and films. Utilising characters from a novel in a book purporting to be a sequel of that novel is an example of potential infringement of moral rights.

Variances

Personal Rights

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