GLOSSARY

Adjudication

/əˌdʒuːdɪˈkeɪʃn/

Definition

A statutory or contractual procedure by which a party to a construction contract has a right to have a dispute decided by an adjudicator (usually within 28 days of referral). Subject to contract provisions to the contrary, the adjudicator’s decision is binding unless/until either party commences court/arbitration proceedings.

Construction

A method of dispute resolution devised, originally, for use in the construction industry
The principles of adjudication are established in the Housing, Grants, Construction and Regeneration Act 1996 as a form of dispute resolution which will be applied to construction and engineering disputes which fulfil certain minimum statutory criteria. The process is a fast track procedure with limited right of redress although ultimately any adjudicated matter can be heard through the courts.

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