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Eleanor Scogings
Solicitor
LALIVE
Joachim Knoll
Partner
LALIVE
Noradèle Radjai
Partner
LALIVE
Contributions by LALIVE

8

Swiss Rules of International Arbitration
Swiss Rules of International Arbitration
Practice notes

This Practice Note provides an introduction to the Swiss Rules of International Arbitration (the Swiss Rules) and an overview of the key features of those rules. The Swiss Rules are provided by the Swiss Chambers’ Arbitration Institution (SCAI). This Practice Note considers the use of the Swiss Rules (according to available statistics) and highlights their important features.

Swiss Rules—appointing the tribunal
Swiss Rules—appointing the tribunal
Practice notes

This Practice Note sets out how an arbitral tribunal will be appointed under the Swiss Rules of International Arbitration (the Swiss Rules), including in multi-party situations. It also sets out the powers of the Arbitration Court of the Swiss Chambers’ Arbitration Institution where there is a failure to constitute the tribunal and covers how an arbitrator will be replaced under the Swiss Rules.

Swiss Rules—costs and security for costs
Swiss Rules—costs and security for costs
Practice notes

This Practice Note sets out the costs that will be incurred in an arbitration under the Swiss Rules of International Arbitration (the Swiss Rules) as administered by the Swiss Chambers’ Arbitration Institution (SCAI). It sets out the payments that will be required by the institution and the tribunal’s powers on costs. The Practice Note also covers the tribunal’s powers to order security for costs.

Swiss Rules—evidence
Swiss Rules—evidence
Practice notes

This Practice Note sets out how evidence is dealt with in an arbitration under the Swiss Rules of International Arbitration (the Swiss Rules) as administered by the Swiss Chambers’ Arbitration Institution (SCAI). It considers the collection and admissibility of evidence, the use of expert witnesses, the use of party-appointed expert witnesses, the use of tribunal-appointed expert witnesses, and witnesses of fact.

Swiss Rules—key features
Swiss Rules—key features
Practice notes

This Practice Note sets out some of the key features to note about the Swiss Rules of International Arbitration (the Swiss Rules), as administered by the Swiss Chambers’ Arbitration Institution (SCAI), that may not be common in other arbitral institutions. These include—a prohibition on appointment members of the Arbitration Court in tribunals, withdrawal of arbitrators following a challenge, co-arbitrators ability to issue written warnings prior to removal of an arbitrator and expedited procedures.

Swiss Rules—procedure
Swiss Rules—procedure
Practice notes

This Practice Note sets out the procedure of an arbitration under the Swiss Rules of International Arbitration (the Swiss Rules) as administered by the Swiss Chambers’ Arbitration Institution (SCAI). It covers the notice of arbitration and answer, the parties’ submissions or pleadings, determining the seat, the hearing, the language and confidentiality of the proceedings, the close of proceedings, the award and the expedited procedure.

Swiss Rules—responding to a Notice of Arbitration (the Answer to the Notice of Arbitration)
Swiss Rules—responding to a Notice of Arbitration (the Answer to the Notice of Arbitration)
Practice notes

This Practice Note sets out how a respondent to a Notice of Arbitration under the Arbitration rules of the Swiss Chambers’ Arbitration Institution (SCAI) must respond. It addresses when the answer to their notice of arbitration must be sent, how it must be sent and what it must contain. It also covers the issue of joining a third party under the Swiss Rules.

Swiss Rules—tribunal's powers
Swiss Rules—tribunal's powers
Practice notes

This Practice Note considers the powers of an arbitral tribunal appointed under the Swiss Rules of International Arbitration (the Swiss Rules) as administered by the Swiss Chambers’ Arbitration Institution (SCAI). It considers the power of tribunals under the Swiss Rules to determine its own jurisdiction, grant and modify interim relief, determine the applicable law, conduct the proceedings, issue an award and determine costs.

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