746. Ambiguous representations.

Where the representation genuinely and reasonably can have more than one meaning, the representee1 must show in which of the possible senses he understood it, and that in that sense it was false2. Where he is able so to do, the fact that it might have been understood in a different sense, which was not false, will not avail the representor3. Furthermore, the use of an ambiguous representation may be indicative of fraud on the part of the representor where it can be shown that the ambiguity was employed for the purpose of misleading the representee; so that, where