In BYOD we trust...

In BYOD we trust...

Against a backdrop of data security scares arising from increasing use by employees of their own devices, the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) recently warned that organisations must ensure that their data protection policies reflect the working practices of their employees and Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) issues in particular.

The warning was given in the context of a report of an incident involving the loss of a Royal Veterinary College (RVC) staff member's camera.   The camera contained a memory card on which the passport images of six job applicants were recorded.  The exact circumstances of how and why the images were on an employee's personal device are not detailed, but there is nothing to suggest there was any malicious intent behind it and it is notable that the RVC themselves chose to inform the ICO of the loss.

This incident has been discussed in some depth in the context of the growing 'trend' of BYOD.  That is perhaps to take a slightly narrow view of its applicability.  It is an admirable function of the human condition that people will use whatever tools are at their disposal in a creative manner to get the job done. Of course, when that conflicts with the rights of others (here the data subjects'), regulation is required.  However, if an employee's instinct to find a solution is to be hindered, it is in the interests of their employer to implement effective policies and training to explain w

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