Latest legal and regulatory news : 8th January

Latest legal and regulatory news : 8th January

 

In this issue:

Risk & Compliance

Commercial

Corporate

Information Law & TMT

Employment

Additional news—daily and weekly news alerts

Dates for your diary

Useful information  

In-house

LexTalk®In-house: a Lexis®PSL community


 

Risk & Compliance

Brexit

On 24 December 2020, after rollercoaster negotiations, the UK and EU announced they had agreed a post-Brexit TCA. At 11pm on December 31 2020 the Brexit implementation period ended, and the UK exited the EU Single Market and the Customs Union. The TCA provides for zero tariffs and quotas. It represents a fundamental shift in the EU-UK relationship with substantially reduced market access but greater UK autonomy. Phillip Souta, head of UK Public Policy at Clifford Chance, examines what the TCA covers, what it doesn’t, and what happens next. See News Analysis: Comment—Relieved? UK and EU agree post-Brexit deal and Brexit Bulletin—examining the EU-UK Trade Cooperation Agreement.

As the Brexit transition period came to an end at 11pm on 31 December 2020, marking IP completion day in the UK, the government published over 300 items of new and updated Brexit transition guidance. While many of the updates are minor, including simple amendments to reflect the end of the transition period having occurred, a significant number of new documents and webpages were also published. Topics covered include: movement of goods and services, immigration, travel, transport, professional qualifications, legal services, litigation, companies, data, telecoms, IP, life sciences, healthcare, education, energy, environment, benefits, pensions, EU funding and sanctions. Also included is guidance for legal professionals and service providers, recognition of professional qualifications and cross-border legal cases. See: LNB News 01/01/2021 1LNB News 01/01/2021 15 and LNB News 01/01/2021 17.

Law360, London: Britain’s trade deal with the EU marked the country’s final break from a regulatory framework that guided its laws for four decades, but it also left some key areas of unfinished legal realignment likely to dominate post-Brexit relations for years to come. See: Finance and data top Brexit deal’s list of unfinished business.


 

Data protection

The EU-UK TCA includes a chapter on data flows and personal data protection, providing good news for data protection practitioners preparing for the end of the Brexit implementation period at 11pm on 31 December 2020. Eleonor Duhs, director and barrister at Fieldfisher discusses the implications of this deal and the next steps regarding data adequacy. See News Analysis: UK-EU data flows, adequacy and regulatory changes from 1 January 2021. See also Practice Note: What does IP completion day mean for Risk & Compliance?—Data protection.

The ICO has published updated guidance on international transfers under UK data protection law after the UK's exit from the Brexit transition/implementation period. See: LNB News 05/01/2021 58. See also Practice Note: International data transfers—practical compliance.


 

Financial crime prevention

At the end of the Brexit implementation period at 11 pm on 31 December 2020, the government reissued a number of webpages and guidance documents relevant to sanctions, collating existing stakeholder and sectoral guidance on legal and practical changes taking effect from 1 January 2021. Subjects covered include the UK sanctions framework, sanctions relating to specific countries and related guidance. See: LNB News 01/01/2021 24. See also Practice Note: What does IP completion day mean for Risk & Compliance?—International financial sanctions.

Law 360: The year ahead promises plenty of developments for white collar crime lawyers to watch in the UK, including a Supreme Court decision that will determine the global reach of the Serious Fraud Office’s investigatory powers and a civil trial with ramifications for the agency’s long-running probe into miner Eurasian Natural Resources Corporation (ENRC). See News Analysis: The biggest UK corporate crime cases to watch in 2021.


 

Commercial

Brexit and beyond

The European Union (Future Relationship) Act 2020 Act makes provision to implement the TCA and associated agreements, and further provision in connection with the UK’s future relationship with the EU and its Member States, as well as related provision on specific matters concerning trade and security, including provisions on criminal records, passenger name record data, evidence and extradition, customs, tax, social security, and privileges and immunities, and for connected purposes. It comes into force partly on 30 December 2020, and comes into force fully on such day as a Minister of the Crown may by regulations appoint. Different days may be appointed for different purposes. See: LNB News 31/12/2020 24 and News Analysis: Examining the European Union (Future Relationship) Act 2020.

Following the end of the Brexit transition/implementation period at 11pm on 31 December 2020, the government has been reissuing a number of Brexit webpages and guidance documents relevant to Commercial practice, collating existing stakeholder and sectoral guidance on legal and practical changes taking effect from 1 January 2021. Sectors and subjects covered include: the creative industries sector; the arts, culture and heritage sectors; the digital, technology and computer services sectors; the media and broadcasting sectors; the sports and recreation sector; the tourism sector; product marketing standards; protecting intellectual property abroad; rail transport; import/export; international agreements; rules of origin; and overseas goods and goods on the market. The guidance within the refreshed webpages may not necessarily be new but the pages are worth noting for future reference and bookmarking. Some of the guidance contains simple updates and reference amendments to reflect the end of the transition period having occurred. Some of the guidance published post-IP completion day may also contain substantive updates to reflect changes taking effect in light of the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (and related arrangements). See: LNB News 05/01/2021 98LNB News 04/01/2021 18LNB News 04/01/2021 17LNB News 04/01/2021 97LNB News 01/01/2021 29LNB News 01/01/2021 21LNB News 01/01/2021 25 and LNB News 01/01/2021 19.

The Cabinet Office has published a further update to the revised GB-EU Border Operating Model, which was reissued on 31 December 2020, following the signature of the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA), and associated arrangements agreed between the UK and EU. The updated model includes additional guidance on preferential Rules Of Origin, as well as updates to the associated text and case studies. See: LNB News 05/01/2021 91.

HMRC has updated its Authorised Economic Operator Status guidance to help stakeholders prepare for the end of the transition period and beyond. See: LNB News 05/01/2021 68.


 

Contracts

The Company Law Committee (CLC) of the Law Society has published a Q&A on the use of electronic signatures in commercial law matters. In the Q&A, the CLC covers questions in relation to witnessing, methods of electronic signature, company board minutes and articles of association. Given that electronic signing is not possible for documents requiring rules of formality to be followed, such as statutory declarations and wills, these are not addressed by the Q&A. See: LNB News 06/01/2021 48.

The appeal case of Etihad Airways PJSC v Flöther raises for the first time in the English courts an important issue of principle concerning the scope and effect of Article 31(2) of Regulation (EU) 1215/2012, Brussels I (recast). The issue was whether Article 31(2) on its true interpretation as a matter of EU law, applies to an agreement conferring exclusive jurisdiction on the courts of an EU Member State, in circumstances where the exclusive choice of court agreement applies to proceedings initiated by one party but not (or not necessarily) to proceedings initiated by the other party. The Court of Appeal held that, such an asymmetric clause is an exclusive jurisdiction clause for the purposes of the regulation. While not deciding the point, the court also commented that the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements (2005 Hague Convention) should probably be interpreted as not applying to asymmetric clauses. Written by Georgia Whiting, barrister, 4 King’s Bench Walk. See News Analysis: Court of Appeal—asymmetric clauses are exclusive jurisdiction clauses for the purposes of Brussels I (recast) (Etihad Airways PJSC v Flöther).

In SK Shipping v Capital (The C Challenger), the High Court has provided a helpful review and restatement of the law on what constitutes actionable misrepresentation, affirmation in the context of rescission and termination, reservation of rights, remedies and liability under a guarantee. In doing so, the court found, among other things, that SK Shipping, the claimant and owner, had not misrepresented the speed and consumption characteristics of the vessel, The C Challenger, and therefore did not entitle rescission of the charterparty or that it was in breach of it by Capital, the defendant and charterer. Written by Sandip Patel, managing partner at Aliant Law. See News Analysis: High Court clarifies and updates the law on misrepresentation, affirmation and reservation of rights (SK Shipping Europe plc v Capital VLCC 3 Corp).


 

Public procurement

As anticipated, the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) agreed between the EU and the UK contains specific provisions relevant to public procurement and State aid. The government says that these provisions allow the UK to maintain and reform its own independent regime. However, this is subject to adherence to the UK’s commitments under the WTO Government Procurement Agreement and the specific framework of rules agreed with the EU in respect of public procurement and subsidy control. Fergus Randolph QC of Brick Court Chambers highlights the key provisions agreed with the EU in this area. See: LNB News 04/01/2021 95.


 

Corporate

Brexit

At the end of the Brexit transition/implementation period at 11 pm on 31 December 2020, the government reissued a number of webpages and guidance documents relevant to Corporate practice, collating existing stakeholder and sectoral guidance on legal and practical changes taking effect from 1 January 2021. Subjects covered include (amongst other things) setting up a business, audit, accounting, data protection, company registration and compliance. The guidance within the refreshed webpages may not be new but the pages are worth noting for future reference and bookmarking. Some of the guidance simply contains updates and reference amendments to reflect the end of the transition period having occurred. However, some of the guidance published on IP completion day also contains substantive updates to reflect changes taking effect in light of the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) (and related arrangements). See: LNB News 01/01/2021 28.


 

Equity capital markets

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) has updated its webpage on the equivalence of non-UK regimes for the purposes of the financial reporting, major shareholding notification and general information requirements in the Disclosure Guidance and Transparency Rules sourcebook (DTR) at DTR 4 to 6. Third-country issuers from these jurisdictions will be exempt from certain requirements in DTR 4 to 6 if they comply with the equivalent requirements in those jurisdictions. See: LNB News 06/01/2021 22.

The FCA has also published an indicative list of financial instruments that will be subject to notification requirements as of 1 January 2021 by virtue of section 89F(1)(b)(iii) of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 and DTR 5.3.1 R. The FCA has also published an updated TR-1: Standard form for notification of major holdings. See: LNB News 30/12/2020 7.


 

Accounts and audit

The Financial Reporting Council (FRC) has announced the launch of the UK Endorsement Board (UKEB) website. The UKEB will be responsible for influencing the development, endorsement and adoption of new or amended international accounting standards, issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) for use by UK companies, from 1 January 2021. See: LNB News 06/01/2021 52.

The FRC has published guidance for preparers using IFRS and their auditors. Proposed wording is included to interpret the basis of preparing accounts where ‘an entity has a financial period which straddles the end of the transition period’. See: LNB News 04/01/2021 43.


 

Director disqualification and deterrence

Restructuring & Insolvency analysis: In Rwamba v Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy [2020] EWHC 2778 (Ch)[2020] All ER (D) 15 (Nov), Mr Justice Miles overturned the judgment of the court below, which refused to provide Mr Rwamba permission to act as a director of two companies, and granted him permission to act. The case involved an application to the court under section 17(3) of the Company Directors Disqualification Act 1986 (CDDA 1986) for leave to be a director notwithstanding Mr Rwamba’s two previous disqualifications. The judgment highlights the balance between the questions of ‘need’ and ‘public protection’ and the element of deterrence. Miles J viewed deterrence as being ‘baked’ into the disqualification regime, however this did not mean that deterrence must be weighed more heavily in opposition of granting permission solely because the disqualification arose from a breach of conditions attached to an earlier grant of permission to act as a director. The judgment handed down by Miles J is groundbreaking in that it is the first reported case where permission has been granted to a director who is seeking permission under a previous leave order. The case will be of interest to practitioners who specialise in proceedings (and applications for leave to act) made under CDDA 1986. Written by Mandeep Kaur Virdee, managing partner, and Maria Madara, trainee solicitor, at KaurMaxwell Solicitors. See News Analysis: Director disqualification and deterrence (Rwamba v Secretary of State for Business)


 

Public company takeovers

The Takeover Panel has published a revised version of the Takeover Code on its website, to reflect changes made pursuant to the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. Subscribers will be despatched printed copies of the amended pages. See: LNB News 04/01/2021 24.


 

Information Law & TMT

Brexit

At the end of the Brexit transition/implementation period at 11 pm on 31 December 2020, the government reissued a number of webpages and guidance documents relevant to information law and TMT, collating existing stakeholder and sectoral guidance on legal and practical changes taking effect from 1 January 2021. Subjects covered include telecoms, broadcasting, eCommerce, personal data, digital services and intellectual property. The guidance within the refreshed webpages may not be new but the pages are worth noting for future reference and bookmarking. Some of the guidance contains simple updates and reference amendments to reflect the end of the transition period having occurred. Some of the guidance published on IP completion day may also contain substantive updates to reflect changes taking effect in light of the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (and related arrangements). See: LNB News 01/01/2021 22.


 

Data protection

MLex: Video-sharing app TikTok faces a class action in the courts of England and Wales for misuse of private information and unlawful processing of data in breach of the EU General Data Protection Regulation. See News Analysis: TikTok faces UK class action brought by children’s rights watchdog.


 

ePrivacy

MLex: European telecoms and internet companies could see more flexibility to use customer data for new services under a revised text of the EU’s draft ePrivacy Regulation being debated by national governments. An earlier version had removed legal grounds for processing personal data that operators see as essential to develop new services. The new version also loosens the restrictions around ‘cookie walls’ on websites. See News Analysis: EU telecoms and internet companies may get more flexibility on data use in latest ePrivacy text.


 

New technologies

The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has released a number of factsheets relating to new drone rules that came into force as of 31 December 2020. These new rules, which were recently published by the European Union Safety Agency (EASA), harmonise drone rules throughout all EU Member States, Norway and Iceland, and have been mirrored in the UK’s laws. Under the new rules, drones will be divided into three categories (low-risk, medium-risk and high-risk) with increasingly stringent rules applying respectively to each. The rules also require all drones to be registered with each Member States’ aviation authority—the CAA for the UK. See: LNB News 31/12/2020 4.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has published an independent report on artificial intelligence (AI) carried out by the AI Council providing recommendations for the UK National AI Strategy. The report ‘draws on the expertise of its members and those in its wider ecosystem to summarise four pillars on which to build the UK’s future in AI’. It also invites government action to keep the UK at the forefront of responsible and safe AI. The aim is to cement the UK as one of the best places in the world to live with, work with and develop AI. The report says the UK needs to ‘double down’ on investment the UK has recently made in AI and to look to the horizon and be adaptable to disruption. See: LNB News 06/01/2021 17.

On 18 December 2020, the UK House of Lords Liaison Committee on artificial intelligence (AI) published a new report, AI in the UK—No Room for Complacency. The report considers the UK government’s progress against the recommendations made by the Select Committee on AI in their 2018 report, AI in the UK—ready, willing and able? Sue McLean, a partner in the Technology Department at Baker McKenzie, summarises the findings and new recommendations made by the report covering public understanding of AI, use of data, ethics, public trust and regulation, jobs and the role of government. See News Analysis: House of Lords Committee publishes new report ‘AI in the UK—No Room for Complacency’.


 

Advertising, marketing and sponsorship

The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has confirmed that promotions for unhealthy food and drinks high in fat, salt or sugar (HFSS) in online and in-store retailers will be restricted from April 2022. The new rules concentrate on the products that contribute the highest sugar and calorie intakes in children and aim to prohibit multibuy promotions such as, ‘buy one get one free’ or ‘3 for 2’ offers, as well as the restriction of free refills of sugary soft drinks in medium and large stores of the eating-out sector. The Nutrient Profiling Model of 2004 to 2005 will be used when categorising a product as HFSS. Unhealthy promotions will cease to be featured in key locations, such as checkouts, store entrances, aisle ends and ‘their online equivalents’, including homepages, shopping basket and payment pages. See: LNB News 04/01/2021 8.

DHSC has also opened a consultation on how best to enforce the restriction of promoted HFSS products. DHSC consulted on restricting promotions of food and drink that is HFSS in 2019 and in its response said that ‘the government will legislate to restrict promotion of multibuy HFSS products as well as HFSS products in store entrances, aisle ends and checkouts for stores over 185.8 square metres (2,000 square feet) and in the equivalent locations online’. DHSC is now seeking views on its proposed technical definitions of these locations and the text of its draft regulations. DHSC welcomes views from businesses and enforcement bodies. The deadline for responses is 22 February 2021 at 11:59 pm. See: LNB News 04/01/2021 59.


 

Internet

EURid has emailed all UK registrants of the .eu domain name to notify them that, as of 1 January 2021, their domain name is no longer compliant with the .eu regulatory framework and is thus moved to the ‘suspended’ status until 31 March 2021. A domain name in the ‘suspended’ status can be reinstated by updating the registration data to meet eligibility criteria, which requires indicating a legally established entity in one of the eligible EU Member States, updating residence to an EU Member State, or proving citizenship of an EU Member State, regardless of residence. See: LNB News 06/01/2021 6.


 

Employment

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

The Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, and Scottish First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, have both announced that England and Scotland are entering national lockdown following rapid increases in coronavirus (COVID-19) infections. The steep rise in cases has been attributed to ‘the new variant’ of coronavirus, which government scientists believe to be between 50–70% more transmissible. Both lockdowns forbid the public from leaving their homes unless for essential purposes, for example shopping for basic necessities, going to work (if you cannot do so from home) and exercising with your household or support bubble. Restrictions in England are expected to last until mid-February 2021, and in Scotland until the end of January 2021, but will be kept under review. See: LNB News 05/01/2021 35.


 

Brexit

At the end of the Brexit transition/implementation period at 11 pm on 31 December 2020, the government reissued a number of webpages and guidance documents relevant to immigration and employment, collating existing stakeholder and sectoral guidance on legal and practical changes taking effect from 1 January 2021. Subjects covered include residence rights, travel, social security, healthcare and education. The guidance within the refreshed webpages may not be new but the pages are worth noting for future reference and bookmarking. Some of the guidance contains simple updates and reference amendments to reflect the end of the transition period having occurred. Some of the guidance published on IP completion day may also contain substantive updates to reflect changes taking effect in light of the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (and related arrangements). See: LNB News 01/01/2021 9.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) has published updated guidance on providing services and travelling for business from 1 January 2021 to help stakeholders prepare for the end of the transition period and beyond. The guidance includes updated information to reflect the changes created by the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement. See: LNB News 29/12/2020 10 

The Progressive Policy Think Tank (PPTT) has published an analysis of the EU-UK post-Brexit trade deal, highlighting the benefit of the deal over no deal but finding important implications for labour, environmental protections and state aid. In particular, the PPTT analysis finds that the deal ‘leaves workers’ rights and environmental protections at serious risk of erosion’ because the newly agreed process for safeguarding a ‘level playing field’ sets such as high bar for proof that the key elements are ‘likely to be enforced only rarely’. See: LNB News 28/12/2020 25.


 

Worker status and categories

In (1) Angard Staffing Solutions, (2) Royal Mail Group v (1) Kocur, (2) Roberts (UKEAT/0105/19/JOJ & UKEAT/0209/19/JOJ) the EAT held that the right conferred by regulation 13(1) of the Agency Workers’ Regulations 2010, SI 2010/93, (the AWR 2010), which provides that an agency worker has, during an assignment, the right to be informed by the hirer of any relevant vacant posts with the hirer, to give the agency worker the same opportunity as a comparable worker to find permanent employment with the hirer, does not mean that the agency worker has a right to be entitled to apply for and be considered for internal vacancies on the same terms as directly-recruited employees. Further, the EAT held that differences between agency workers and comparable directly-recruited employees in their shift length, the scheduling of breaks, the availability of overtime and attendance at training sessions during working time did not amount to a breach of reg 5(1) of the AWR 2010 which entitles agency workers, with 12 weeks of qualifying service, to the same basic terms and conditions relating to pay and working time issues. This judgment provides a useful set of examples of what falls inside and outside the scope of protection afforded to agency workers under the AWR 2010. It offers a reminder that there is no overarching principle of equal treatment between agency workers and comparable employees generally and that agency workers can only succeed in complaints that fall squarely within the parameters of the legislation. See News Analysis: Agency workers: right to be informed of relevant vacancy does not include right to apply ((1) Angard Staffing Solutions, (2) Royal Mail Group v (1) Kocur, (2) Roberts).


 

Pay, benefits and tax

The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has released a statement outlining 139 companies, including major household names, such as Tesco and Pizza Hut, that have failed to pay their workers National Minimum Wage (NMW) and were served with a notice of underpayment between September 2016 and July 2018, following investigations by HMRC. In a breach of employment law, the group of companies has failed to pay £6.7m to over 95,000 workers. Tesco alone is responsible for over £5m of the total. Failures to pay NMW were primarily caused by low-paid employees being required to cover their own work costs, having to pay for training, uniform or parking fees. Additionally, where employees moved into a different NMW bracket following a birthday, not all employers increased their pay as required. The 139 companies named and shamed must pay back their workers and face financial penalties for their conduct. See: LNB News 04/01/2021 15.

The Statutory Sick Pay (General) (Coronavirus Amendment) Regulations 2020, SI 2020/1638 amend the Statutory Sick Pay (General) Regulations 1982, SI 1982/894, with effect from 24 December 2020 in order to ensure that individuals will be eligible for Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) for the full period for which they are required to self-isolate, including where they have tested positive for coronavirus, or where they are in a household with someone who has tested positive in England, Scotland, and Wales. See: LNB News 24/12/2020 2.

HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) has published new guidance on National Insurance (NI) and social security contributions for UK and EU workers to help stakeholders prepare for the end of the transition period and beyond. See: LNB News 28/12/2020 6.


 

Working time

The Drivers’ Hours and Tachographs (Amendment) Regulations 2020, SI 2020/1658 amend three pieces of UK legislation in relation to rules relating to drivers’ hours and tachographs. They came into force in part immediately before IP completion day and in full on IP completion day. See: LNB News 04/01/2021 9.


 

Immigration

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) agreed between the EU and UK on 24 December 2020 contains a limited number of immigration-related provisions, primarily related to the supply of services, intra-corporate transferees, and short-term business visitors/business visits for the purpose of establishment. The government issued Statement of Changes in Immigration Rules CP 361 on 31 December 2020 in order to give effect to various aspects of these agreed provisions in the UK, as well as to relevant provisions in the recent UK-Switzerland Services Mobility Agreement (approved in early December 2020). This analysis looks at these provisions, and also includes comment from Kate Gamester, knowledge development lawyer at Charles Russell Speechlys. See News Analysis: Implementing the TCA—business immigration implications.


 

Practice and procedure

In Duvenage v NSL (UKEATS/0002/20/SS, UKEATS/0003/20/SS, UKEATS/0004/20/SS & UKEATS/0005/20/SS) the EAT held that a party who makes an application to strike out all or part of a party’s claim or response under Rule 37(1) of the Employment Tribunals (Constitution and Rules of Procedure) Regulations 2013 (the ET Rules), has no right under Rule 37(2) to insist upon that application being considered at an oral hearing in public. It is only the party at risk of the consequences of a successful application that can insist on there being a hearing. See News Analysis: Party making application for strike out has no right to insist on oral hearing (Duvenage v NSL).

The Lord Chief Justice, Lord Burnett of Maldon, has published a message in light of the latest coronavirus restrictions. Lord Burnett confirms that courts and tribunals will continue to operate and attendance in person is permitted but facilitating remote attendance of all or some of those involved in hearings is the default position in all jurisdictions, whether backed by regulations or not. See: LNB News 05/01/2021 61.

The EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) agreed between the EU and the UK contains extensive provisions on judicial and law enforcement co-operation in relation to criminal matters, but is silent on civil judicial co-operation, leaving open questions regarding the immediate implications for cross-border dispute resolution once the Brexit transition period ended at 11 pm on 31 December 2020. However, noting that the agreement on the TCA may give cause for cautious optimism in respect of the UK’s application to accede to the Lugano Convention, Gordon Nardell QC and Michal Hain, barristers at Twenty Essex, comment on the agreement and its impact for cross-border dispute resolution and legal services. The Law Society of England and Wales has welcomed the agreement but noted its limitations in the fields of cross-border legal services and dispute resolution. See: LNB News 30/12/2020 6.


 

Additional news—daily and weekly news alerts

This document contains the highlights from the past week’s news. To receive all our news stories, whether on a daily or a weekly basis, amend your personal settings within your ‘News’ tab on the homepage by clicking on either ‘Email’ or ‘RSS’ (depending on how you prefer to receive them) on the right-hand side of the blue banner.


 

Dates for your diary

Time

Event

Subjects Covered

8 January 2021

Webinar—TMT

Adtech in 2020—A privacy perspective

On demand

Webinar—TMT

FinTech (2020)

On demand

Webinar—TMT

Cloud computing (2020)

On demand

Webinar—TMT

Drones law (2020)

On demand

Webinar—TMT

Influencers and intellectual property (2020)

On demand

Webinar—TMT

(Brief) The Copyright Directive (2020)

Q4 2020

Webinar—TMT

Adtech in 2020

Q4 2020

Webinar—TMT

The European Electronic Communication Code (2020)

Q4 2020

Webinar—Commercial Law

Commercial Law—End of year round-up 2020

Q4 2020

Webinar—Commercial Law

Consumer law in 2020

Q4 2020

Webinar—Commercial Law

E-commerce in 2020




Useful information

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In-house

Virtual networking and forum events

There’s no need to feel isolated if you’re working from home—join one of our virtual networking or forum events. Even if you aren’t working from home, take some time to network with your peers, find out what challenges they’re facing and how they are meeting those challenges.

20 January 2021
Brexit. Thriving in a new era
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In this session we’ll be discussing our thoughts on how to deal with the new world (whatever that may be) after the end of the Brexit transition period. There also be an opportunity to share experiences and helpful insights with your peers under Chatham House rules.
Held in partnership with Radius Law and Flex Legal.

27 January 2021
Virtual Lunch
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A continuation of our series of Virtual Lunches that provide an insight into the legal industry and networking opportunities.
Held in partnership with Flex Legal and Crafty Counsel.

24 February 2021
IR35, worker status and the end of self-employment?
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The planned changes to IR35 are now scheduled to be in force in April 2021 (deferred from April 2020). Join this session to learn how you can safeguard your organisation against significant liabilities and prevent your business from making incorrect and costly decisions.
Held in partnership with Radius Law and Flex Legal.

24 March 2021
The commercial benefit of effective panel management
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An opportunity to share experiences and helpful insights with your peers under Chatham House rules. This month we focus on effective panel management. Discover how legal teams take a strategic approach to law firm management to demonstrate commercial value to their organisations.
Held in partnership with Radius Law and Flex Legal.

Various dates
LexisNexis® Aspire Forum for Junior In-house Lawyers
To register your interest in joining the events, sign up as an Aspire member today

Aspire is a professional development and networking forum for junior in-house counsel. Following the success of the summer event series, we have several events planned for the remainder of the year to continue supporting you through these uncertain times and provide a platform for you to connect with your peers. Events take place at the same time each month, from 5pm to 6.30pm.

 


 

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About the author:
Allison is a former partner of Shoosmiths, with extensive experience of legal management and practice compliance.