Twitter: Top 10 tips for lawyers

Twitter: Top 10 tips for lawyers

Twitter.

There I've said it. For many professionals Twitter has a bizarre talismanic quality. Don't go anywhere near it! People who use it are insipid, self-serving narcissists.

Just like actors who daren't utter Macbeth and force themselves to mumble the Scottish Play instead, lawyers who mention Twitter are often forced to perform elaborate cleansing rituals to ward off the evil that will ensue. How many times have we all heard a lawyer accidentally quote the 'T' word and then watch as he is unceremoniously bundled from the office, forced to spin around with a tie looped around his head whilst shouting 'TWITTER' three times at the top of his voice?

Never?

Fair enough. But I think that my point is made: there really is no reason to be afraid of the 'T' word.

I've been on Twitter for over a year now and I am a genuine convert—not in that icky, happy-clappy sort of way; more in quiet, low-key 'how-did-I-used-to-cope-without-this?' sort of way. 

My world has not collapsed into a shallow wormhole of meaningless trivia.

So why join? Simply put: you can follow what your clients are doing. You can follow what your competitors are doing. You can follow what Stephen Fry @stephenfry is doing (you are entitled to a bit of fun too).

For many businesses Twitter is now their first port of call for information that they want to get out there. Quickly. If you are not on Twitter you are potentially missing out on an important conduit for information.

On the flip side of the coin, Twitter is an easy way of letting your clients know what you are up to. You can remind them about upcoming changes in the law. Or perhaps you have a seminar that you need to advertise more widely?

And let's not forget, above all, where technology is taking us. It is said that e-mails are now as good as dead for many university students. Over the years I have noticed

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