A crib sheet on drafting schedules (Part 2): time to actually start drafting

A crib sheet on drafting schedules (Part 2): time to actually start drafting

You may recall our article from a few weeks ago:  'A crib sheet on drafting schedules: 7 top tips.'

https://twitter.com/LexisUK_News/status/492636693061971968

Today's post follows on from that article. It sets out six tips on what you need to think about whilst drafting.

Tip 1: Be consistent

Is there any standard form precedent or favoured wording used by your law firm or company?

Is there any standard form precedent or favoured wording used by your client?

If the answer to the questions above is 'yes' and you want to deviate from them, is there a good reason to do so? Is it allowed? If the answer is 'no', is it possible to borrow from or repurpose similar schedules?

Tip 2: Be focussed

Who is your primary audience?

Who is your secondary audience (if any)?

Have your audience in mind when drafting and don't forget that—horror of horrors—it may eventually need to be considered in court.

Tip 3: Be clear

Have you avoided jargon, where possible? Depending on the context, legal terminology should be avoided.

Remember that the schedule may need to be translated into another language (whether as part of the agreement as a whole or as a stand-alone document) or may need to be read by people whose first language is not English.

Furthermore, the Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulatio

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