Standby letters of credit, the “fraud” exception and commercial certainty – English law orthodoxy challenged

Standby letters of credit, the “fraud” exception and commercial certainty – English law orthodoxy challenged

Recent cases have highlighted perceived problems caused by the largely unfettered availability of calls on standby letters of credit or performance bonds in circumstances where the underlying parties are already embroiled in some form of relevant dispute resolution procedure.

In the July/August 2017 edition of Butterworths Journal of International Banking and Financial Law, Andrew Ayres QC questions the reluctance of the courts to interfere with the cashflow dynamics between the parties to a standby.

Click here to read the full article.

 

Related Articles:
Latest Articles:
About the author:

Neeta started her legal career at Allen & Overy in 2008 in the midst of the global financial crisis and the collapse of Lehmans where she gained most of her paralegal experience.

Neeta also did a short stint in litigation at the Revenue and Customs Prosecutions Office in 2006. Neeta graduated with a 2:1 honours degree from University of London, Queen Mary College and went on to obtain a distinction from the College of Law in the Legal Practice. She has been working at Lexis Nexis since April 2013.